Winter in Canada…

Winter is Canada’s most famous season often consisting with heavy storms, snow, rain, etc.Which is why most Canadians truly appreciate the warm summer months.

Rough weather in general can be very dangerous… and many Canadian regions are no strangers to this type of inclement weather. Something people in temperate climates tend not to take into account when they grumble about their changeable but relatively human-friendly weather. In the more habitable parts of Canada, it’s the heat and cold that get you rather than violent storms. Where plus 30 centigrade and sticky in summer, and minus 30 and sharp as a knife in winter, either way, Canadian winters can be very dangerous if you’re not properly prepared. If you are pro-active and take a few necessary precautions in the weeks and months before winter strikes, then winter in Canada can be a beautiful time of year.

However, often hazardous Canadian winters can be very rough on a persons home, specifically the roofing system as it has to endure strong hail and snow pounding against it all winter long.  It is crucial for home owners in high alert snow and storm regions to schedule bi-annual roof inspections to ensure their roofing structure is up to par and ready for the snow storm season ahead. It is extra important to invest in proper roof care when living in areas that are know for the severe winters.  When hail and strong winds are present within these residential areas, many times the homes can suffer considerable storm damage (Specifically from hail storms and strong winds) the roofing, vinyl and aluminum siding, and especially the gutters. Falling trees, branches, and debris can also cause damage to the roof and gutter systems. Hail storms are notorious for causing the most long term damage to a homes roof and in many instances it will not be noticed immediately and over time will be come more apparent. Therefore, a little preventative maintenance can go a long way to ensure the safety of you and your family.

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Snow Covered Rooftops
Snow Covered Rooftops

Needless to say, winters in Canada can be brutally cold as well. This is why many homes in the less populated areas were constructed with fireplaces. A fireplace can often heat an entire house, depending on its size, and save enormous amounts of money on heating bills, and best of all create a cozy winter-like warmth like no other. It is a great feeling when you get to gather by a warm fireplace on a cold snowy night with your family or a special someone.

Cozy Fireplace
Cozy Fireplace

The Canadian winter is more about ice than snow, storms, floods or rain, which is why Canadians do so much better at ice rather than snow sports; world ice hockey champions not ski champions. From October to April, kids and parents practically live inside the local arena in the evenings and weekends, taking part in or watching ice hockey, figure skating, synchronized skating, ice dancing, or ringette. (Ringette is a non-contact form of ice-hockey, involving a rubber ring rather than a tooth-removing puck, developed for girls early in the last century). This winter wonderland starts the moment kids can stand. They begin on ‘training’ skates (with double blades) at three or four and are in highly competitive leagues by six, no time for fun here. Canadians are very easy-going, tolerant people in all respects but one — ice hockey. It’s ‘our’ game and no one better forget that.

Winter in Canada has also provided the world with one truly unique means of transport, the Skidoo or snowmobile. This motorized sled is how folks up north get nearby for the other hand six months of the year, and it’s additionally one of our biggest winter distractions.  Solidified lakes and rivers and snow-secured hiking trails are driven on each weekend by thousands of folks who grumble about commuting for hours each workday. In turn, the more traditionally minded snowshoe-ers and cross-country skiers grumble about the noise and risk they endure from snowmobiles out on the trails. To be fair, Skidoo-ers are more vulnerable to themselves than anyone else, each year we lose two or three Canadians who take these heavy machines onto ice that’s too thin or drives them into wire fences while racing in the dark.

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Snowmobiling is a favorite Canadian pastime
Snowmobiling is a favorite Canadian pastime

Another very peculiar, to me anyhow, Canadian winter pastime is ice-fishing. A sport that requires you to drive a 1.5-tonne pickup truck out onto a frozen lake, put up a fair sized shed complete with seating, heating, and alcohol, drill a hole through the ice and fish round it all day with a group of similarly fearless friends.  Consequently, Canadian lake beds have more sunken trucks than boats on them.

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Ice Fishing Hole
Ice Fishing Hole

Frozen lakes are also good for Skidoo and ice-bike racing; our nearest suitable lake, for example, is more crowded on winter weekends with competitors and spectators, in addition to the ice fisherman and their trucks, than it is with boaters in summer. By and by, I’m never happy with remaining on the surface of a profound lake, regardless of how thick the ice is. You do have to be born here for that.

Special Thanks to our friends at www.owensbororoofpro.com for sponsoring our website and providing some valuable information included in this post.

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